Books and Baby Food

I’m sitting here with my usual companion,

who is refusing to look at the camera after being kicked off my lap/keyboard about half a dozen times. She’s probably reconsidering whether I’m still her favorite human, but I keep the food dish full, so I feel secure in my position.

Anyhoo…, I’m trying to think of something to write about besides baby food (sweet potato=major fail; zucchini=gobble, gobble, gobble. Go figure).

Hmmm, something will come to me…

Toys? No…

Spit-up? No…isn’t that supposed to dial back with the introduction of solid food? Cause so far—

Wait! Stop. Not writing about spit-up…

Diapers? Definitely not (worried you there for a second, didn’t I?).

Books? Yes, books. Totally acceptable topic. I should write about something I’ve read recently…hmmm…how about something I’ve purchased recently:

Periodically, I wholeheartedly volunteer to go get groceries in the evening while Hubby is on baby duty. And, well, Chapters just happens to be right next to the grocery store (crazy coincidence).  Since Kiddo’s arrival five short months ago,  I have added the following to my bookshelf—already packed with unread volumes:

Trouble in Mind: A collection of short stories by Jeffery Deaver. I’ve read one story so far; it didn’t blow me away. Maybe more on that in a later post. If I remember, which is unlikely. Never mind.

The Bazaar of Bad Dreams: Also a short-story collection, this one by Stephen King. I’m on page 22, still near the beginning of the first story (the first seven pages were the author intro).

I picked short-story collections thinking I might have a snowball’s chance in hell of finishing a complete story in a reasonable amount of time, maybe even one sitting. Turns out both Jeff and Steve consider 15000+ words to be ‘short’. I personally think this is getting into novella territory (or novellette?). According to Writer’s Digest anything under 30k can be called a short story (really?). Maybe it’s just that the length of my ‘one sitting’ has changed dramatically in recent months, but I think that’s ridiculous.

In the Unlikely Event: One of Judy Blume’s for-adults novels. I haven’t read any of her adult stuff, but I’ve been told it’s great by number of people. Including the Chapters employee who was at the checkout when I bought this one. You know how they say, ‘Whatever you do, do it well’? I swear every time I’ve been checked out by this guy he has something relevant to say about the book or the author. I’m starting to wonder if there’s a book in Chapters he hasn’t read. 

I chose this one in particular (and broke my don’t-by-hardcover-unless-it’s-on-sale rule, but it’s ok I had a gift card) partly because the description mentions air disasters of the 50s—three crashes hitting one town. I wondered if one of them was a Comet, early jets of the same time frame that exploded in midair because of square windows. I haven’t cracked this book yet, but I googled the event that apparently inspired it. Turns out the referenced plane crashes predate the Comet crashes by a couple of years. Boy, the 50s were a crappy decade for air travel.

The Dressmaker: Historical fiction by Kate Alcott, a new author for me. I didn’t actually buy this one. My mom recommend and lent it. I’ve made it to page 10, so I’m not really into the story yet but I think it has potential. (Did you notice the upside-down title in my picture? I did, but I’m not taking another one. Baby’s napping, seconds count)

Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation: By Bill Nye, chosen because I like Bill Nye. I usually prefer my science-ish books a little more in depth, but I don’t have a lot of spare brain power these days. The Science Guy’s layman-level writing is just about right for my current non-fiction needs. I’ve read a whopping eighty-eight pages of this one so far.

The Children of Men: This one is by P.D. James and I bought it because for someone who writes sci fi, it’s been a while since I’ve read any. Also I haven’t read any of her books, but I’ve heard good things and was looking for something new. I haven’t started this one yet either, but according to the back cover society’s collapse is about six years away.

So there you have it, my unfulfilled reading expectations. Oh, in the background there is also The Lamb Book from IKEA’s extra-soft, baby-gums-friendly collection. I’ve ‘read’ that one quite a few times and highly recommend it to the 0-12 month crowd.

45 minutes

The baby is napping. I have approximately forty-five minutes of uninterrupted time ahead (probably). If I am ever going to complete a piece of writing ever again, I must learn to take advantage of these little windows.

But…

…someone else wants my attention…

Poor kitties are often neglected these days. How can I resist???

In other news, I got a Chapters gift card for Christmas. Can’t wait to buy more books for my to-be-read-when-my-child-is-seven pile. OK, it’s not that bad. Sometimes I manage to read a whole two pages of a book before I pass out at night.

Stories That Stick: The 11:59

You know the stories you read as a kid that stick in your brain forever? You might go years without thinking about them, then some little trigger pops up and suddenly you not only remember the story, but where you were sitting when you read it, or what shirt you were wearing. Since I began writing, these stories slip to the surface of my consciousness more and more easily. One of the strongest recurring story memories for me is The 11:59.

The 11:59 is from a short story collection called The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural by Patricia C. McKissack (1992). It’s the story of a retired train porter, Lester, who’s telling the young porters the tale of the Death Train that will take them all one day.

“Any porter who hears the whistle of the 11:59 has got exactly twenty-four hours to clear up earthly matters.  He better be ready when the train comes the next night…”

I don’t remember how I got my hands on the book, whether it was from the bookshelf at home or the school library, but I distinctly remember sitting on my bed reading it. I’m not sure what shirt I was wearing, but there was probably a Blue Jays ball cap on my head or somewhere nearby. I also remember that for quite some time afterward (years maybe) I couldn’t help but check my watch if I heard a train whistle after dark, just to make sure it wasn’t 11:59—on at least one occasion, it was. I told myself my watch must be off by a few minutes to stave off a panic attack (and obviously lived to tell about it).

I’m not sure if it was this story that left me with the indelible impression that trains are magic, or if this belief was already there to enhance the chill it gave me (my reading of The Polar Express might have come first), but I still think of The 11:59 when I hear a train after dark. Though, I no longer check my watch. I swear.

Recently, I was compelled to track down The 11:59 (gotta love Google). It was tugging at my memory to the point that I just had to confirm the story was how I remembered it, and not some jumble of other stories mixed together by my all-too-human memory over two decades. Sure enough, the plot was almost exactly how I remembered it.

Reading it again as an adult, I was more aware of the simplicity of the storyline (intended for a young audience) and a typo jumped out at me that I’m sure I would neither have noticed nor cared about when I was ten or eleven. Even reading it in elementary school, I remember finding the story predictable. When Lester hears the 11:59’s whistle, he’s taken over by panic and a mission to accident-proof himself for the next twenty-four hours in hopes he will survive. All the while ignoring the pain in his chest and tingling in his left arm—duh.

But knowing where the roller coaster was going didn’t lessen the thrill of the drops and turns. And years later, the final scenes haven’t lost their magic.

Thoughts on: The Problem of Susan – Neil Gaiman

Where many may have become Neil Gaiman fans through Sandman or Coraline, I first took note of his story telling as a result of an episode he wrote for Doctor Who. Later, I saw his now-famous commencement speech, Make Good Art. This was around the time I was really getting interested in writing, and I thought I could learn a lot from the way this guy approaches work, writing—where they meet—and life.

Recently, I picked up an anthology of short stories, People of the Book: A Decade of Jewish Science Fiction. Aside from my amusement at seeing religion and science fiction side by side, I noticed Neil Gaiman listed as one of the authors. I skipped ahead and read his story, The Problem of Susan, first. I loved it. To get to why I loved it, I have to back up a bit. Continue reading

Mabel’s Mission Published by Mad Scientist Journal

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

Read about the Mabel’s adventures in a world where human experimentation is as common as getting a haircut…but–like haircuts– sometimes it goes horribly wrong. You can read Mabel’s Mission now  (free, no log-in or other effort required) at Mad Scientist Journal.  

And thanks to Shannon Legler for the awesome art.

Almost Time for Mabel’s Mission

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

The crazy adventure of Mabel, a mad scientist’s assistant (written by yours truly) is scheduled to appear on Mad Scientist Journal April 1st 2013. This unique online magazine publishes a new essay every week from the world of mad science. You can view these stories for free on the website–always a fun and unusual read–and/or download their quarterly anthologies for 99 cents on smashwords, with some exclusive fiction added, well worth the 99 cents. The anthologies include variety of short stories (from more than the mad scientists’ realm) and quirky classified ads including my own Osteo-transplant Specialist published in the latest anthology.

So head on over to Mad Scientist Journal or smashwords and mark your calendars for April 1st!

The Cavern is coming to Every Day Fiction!

My short story The Cavern has just been accepted by Every Day Fiction. This is a site that provides free flash fiction daily both on their website, and via email to their subscribers. They will be publishing my winter solstice themed story on Dec 21st. 🙂