Mabel’s Mission Published by Mad Scientist Journal

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

Read about the Mabel’s adventures in a world where human experimentation is as common as getting a haircut…but–like haircuts– sometimes it goes horribly wrong. You can read Mabel’s Mission now  (free, no log-in or other effort required) at Mad Scientist Journal.  

And thanks to Shannon Legler for the awesome art.

Advertisements

Almost Time for Mabel’s Mission

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

The crazy adventure of Mabel, a mad scientist’s assistant (written by yours truly) is scheduled to appear on Mad Scientist Journal April 1st 2013. This unique online magazine publishes a new essay every week from the world of mad science. You can view these stories for free on the website–always a fun and unusual read–and/or download their quarterly anthologies for 99 cents on smashwords, with some exclusive fiction added, well worth the 99 cents. The anthologies include variety of short stories (from more than the mad scientists’ realm) and quirky classified ads including my own Osteo-transplant Specialist published in the latest anthology.

So head on over to Mad Scientist Journal or smashwords and mark your calendars for April 1st!

Mabel’s Mission: Coming to Mad Scientist Journal

Mad Scientist Journal, which I praised in a recent post as the coolest e-zine I’ve found so far, will be publishing my short story Mabel’s Mission on their website. Date TBD. I’ll certainly update with that info when I have it.

In the meantime I suggest checking out other stories on their site. If you like your fiction on the fun-quirky-oddball side, then this e-zine is up your ally — and hopefully you’ll enjoy Mabel’s adventure with human experimentation, diving with water-breathing people, and multicoloured beavers — yup beavers.

Speculative Anthropology?

I just read that there is an anthropological theory stating that people invented civilization for better access to beer. Well, there you have it! The world suddenly makes sense, it all boils down to alcohol.

Sounds dubious? I’ll insert a caveat here: The book I read this in is about breathing and meditation, not anthropology, and though the author does have a Ph.D. in Social Science, he does not cite his source for this particular bit of information. But hey, you never know…

For the sake of interest, the theory goes something like this: Humans have strong socializing instincts; beer is useful in this regard (we know this to be true). To get beer, we need pots to brew it in–voila pottery is born. And of course we need the hops to brew–a stable farming community becomes everyone’s top priority.

Do you feel smarter yet? I feel I should have been an anthropologist.

The Vesuvius Club

OK, so I never intended to make this site a commentary on my likes and dislikes. However, the book I am reading now deserves a mention.

I was sitting in Chapters, procrastinating on one of my own writing projects when The Vesuvius Club caught my eye on a shelf labeled “Quirky Mysteries”. I was reeled in further by the the author, Mark Gatiss, an occasional writer for Doctor Who and a primary writer/creator of BBC’s Sherlock (two of my favorites shows). Sherlock fans you will also know Mark Gatiss as the oh-so-endearing Mycroft Holmes.

So, attention sufficiently grabbed, I picked it up. It’s not a new release, first published in 2004. The back cover promised “Equal parts James Bond and Sherlock Holmes, with a twist of Monty Python and a dash of Austin Powers”. Well that was a must read, and for those of you with a slightly dark and twisted sense of humour, it does not disappoint. By the end of chapter three there has been a glass eye removed with a spoon–to be used as a colour match for a new tie of course–and naked men wrestling in a steam room–those towels aren’t very secure…

If you’re looking for something lighthearted and a little off kilter, I definitely recommend The Vesuvius Club.