Mad Scientist Journal Spring Anthology

Announcement time! The latest anthology of Mad Scientist Journal is now available for download at Smashwords and Amazon. This edition is particularly exciting for me as it includes my story Mabel’s Mission–along with number of other great stories including some exclusive fiction not previously published on the MSJ website.

If you like a fun read from the slightly-weird side of the sci fi world (or if you just want to support me as a writer ūüėČ ) check it out.

Mad Scientish Journal Anthology: Spring 2013

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Find Mad Scientist Journal on Amazon!!

As I have previously posted, Mad Scientist Journal is an ezine that publishes new fiction weekly on its website–that you can read for free. They also amalgamate their stories into quarterly anthologies and add some exclusive content to give more bang for your 99-cent download.

Initially published through smashwords in a number of formats, these anthologies are now available in kindle editions on Amazon. Links to all four, currently available, anthologies are on the MSJ website. My own contribution in the form of a classified ad, Experienced Osteo-transplant Specialist Seeks Work, from Dr. Coccymandible, can be found in the Autumn 2012 Anthology.

Feel free to write a review of one (or all) of these anthologies on Amazon, your own blog, or elsewhere. Help MSJ expand its audience.

An upcoming¬†anthology (Spring 2013, I expect) will also include¬†my short story, Mabel’s Mission, which was published by MSJ on Apr 1st.

Mabel’s Mission Published by Mad Scientist Journal

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

Read about the¬†Mabel’s adventures in a world where human experimentation is as common as getting a haircut…but–like haircuts– sometimes it goes horribly wrong. You can read Mabel’s Mission now ¬†(free,¬†no log-in or other effort required)¬†at¬†Mad Scientist Journal.¬†¬†

And thanks to Shannon Legler for the awesome art.

Almost Time for Mabel’s Mission

…imagine a world where capricious scientists, such as yourselves, have free reign. I just so happen to come from such a world. Honestly…

…Hamish was the epitome of science gone wrong. About four and half feet tall, with wildly disproportionate, beefy limbs, he had tiny insectile eyes that were especially out of place in his large, somewhat bulbous head. His scattered patches of coarse hair were interspersed between a disturbing assortment of tubes coming out of his scalp…

The crazy adventure of Mabel, a mad scientist’s assistant (written by yours¬†truly) is scheduled to appear on¬†Mad Scientist Journal April 1st 2013. This unique online magazine publishes a new essay every week from the world of mad science. You can view these stories for free on the website–always a fun and unusual read–and/or download their quarterly anthologies for 99 cents on smashwords,¬†with some¬†exclusive fiction added, well worth the 99 cents. The anthologies include¬†variety¬†of short stories (from more than the mad scientists’ realm) and quirky classified ads including my own Osteo-transplant Specialist¬†published in the latest anthology.

So head on over to Mad Scientist Journal or smashwords and mark your calendars for April 1st!

More Mad Scientists

The great thing about Mad Scientist Journal  is that the niche they have carved out for themselves allows them to go from quirky to creepy in the blink of an eye. 

Today I read Zero (or, The Collected Correspondence of Patient Zero) by Cameron

It’s not the most recent MSJ publication, but it’s the one that grabbed my attention today. Definitely more in the realm of creepy than quirky, this essay chronicles the final days of patient zero in a series of journal-like entries giving a little more away with each passage about what’s really going on. Also, the author manages to throw in an impressive level of insight into the potential downfall of the human race with a, slightly disturbing,¬†A Modest Proposal¬†feel to it.

Hope you’ll check it out and become a fan of Mad Scientist Journal in time for my own, more quirky than creepy, story Mabel’s Mission¬†to be published on April 1st. You can also download MSJ’s latest anthology on Smashwords¬†for only 99 cents.

 

Equality for Clones?

Time for another plug for Mad Scientist Journal, a relatively new e-zine that will appeal to those of you with an appreciation for humorous, cheeky, or slightly absurd science fiction. Part of the fun is the way they create a true Scientific Journal feel. For example, today I read the latest story published on their website:

How I Learned to Love My Clones: An essay by Dr. Cortico Vox as procured by Folly Blaine.

The title block is in the typical format for the site. Dr. Cortico Vox being the mad scientist contributing his work to the ‘Scientific Journal’ (and the narrator of the story), and the actual author being Folly Blaine. Bios for both Vox and Blaine can be found at the end of the article.

How I Learned to Love My Clones¬†touches on that age-old moral debate (age-old in the sci fi world anyway): How should scientists treat their clones? Expecting a story that was a bit too similar to many I’ve heard or read before, I actually found it was a fun little¬†excursion with some originality to offer, and recommend fiction fans (sci fi or not) check it out.

If you find you like Mad Scientist Journal, their quarterly anthologies can be downloaded at Smashwords.

Happy reading ūüėÄ