Toddlers and Time Travel

There has been a lot of toddler screaming at my house today. The kind of screaming that has the less than rational part of my brain saying, “Extreme pain! Imminent Death! Freak out!” Meanwhile a hard to hear, but more rational part of my brain chimes in with, “Isn’t it time for those two-year molars to come in? How about take some deep breaths and order pizza for dinner.”

I dare not check for physical signs of these molars. Whether they are there or not, there are plenty of other sharp teeth in that mouth. In the absence of symptoms besides the screaming, I’m doing my best to focus on Rational Brain for now.

In other (happier) news, the anthology Time Travel Short Stories that, as I mentioned in a previous post, includes a short story of mine (Hostage) is now published (yay!). Currently it’s available through Flame Tree Publishing, and should be available through Amazon in September. Part one of a two-part author Q&A can be found on the Flame Tree Fantasy and Gothic Blog. Part two will show up on their blog next week (so my sources tell me).

And the doorbell just rang. Pizza!

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Do a Little Dance

For the first time in a while I have some real writing-relevant news to share. A short story of mine Hostage was chosen by Flame Tree Publishing to be included in their upcoming Gothic Fantasy anthology Time Travel Short Stories.

The anthology is due to be published in July 2017 and will include a mixture of both new and classic time travel themed stories. This means, not only will a story of mine be found in a real book of the paper and binding variety, my writing will be alongside the likes of H.G. Wells and Mark Twain. How cool is that?

As evidence I’m not making all this up, the Flame Tree order page for the book is here. It can also be ordered through Indigo and Amazon. I have no idea how many, if any, Canadian/US stores will have hardcopy books in stock (Flame Tree Publishing is in the UK), but we all do our shopping online nowadays anyway, right (or is that just those of us who avoid taking a toddler to the store)?

This is one of those things that makes the whole writing endeavor seem a little less nuts. A feeling that will surely pass around the time I receive my next rejection. In the meantime, I’ll be dancing in the kitchen–probably the better you know me the harder time you’ll have picturing it, but the dance really happened.

Fuzzy Lines

If it’s completely different from the ‘first’ draft can you still call it the ‘second’ draft? I’ve come to realize when this novel is finished I won’t have a clear answer to the question ‘How many drafts did it take?’ The lines between drafts are already becoming fuzzy.

I’m nowhere near finished the second draft of my novel—of course it’s taking longer than planned—but I can already tell it will be very different from the first. On the bright side, it’s much more coherent thus far. There’s a good chance I’ll let other people see this one so I can get some feedback. Then between the feedback and my own fickle mind it will be interesting to see what draft three looks like.

I’m not entirely surprised by the amount of changes considering how dishevelled the first draft was. It would seem I can’t count on ideas coming to me in any kind of proper order. There have been a few short stories that I’ve written start to finish in an afternoon that remained more or less intact after revisions. Usually though, it seems I have to dump all the piece out of my brain then step back and examine them to find the story’s chronology. This is probably why serial publishing turned out to be a mistake for me. Well, mistake isn’t the right word. It was a learning experience.

Not that I didn’t reread and revise every chapter before publishing, but by the time I got to chapter ten of Dosterra, I already wanted to make serious changes to chapters one through nine. I haven’t discounted the idea of eventually finishing this story, but I think I will have to actually finish it, and rewrite it, then maybe it will be ready to send out to the world. (The novel I’m working on now is an entirely different one.)

This has been the latest musing of a short story writer/wannabe novelist. And yeah, I’m procrastinating. Back to the novel now I swear.

Draft One of ??? Complete

I actually have a complete first draft of a novel! I wasn’t sure it would ever happen. Hang on while I savour it for a moment…

…Ok. About the draft:

1) Title TBD. The story has the same main character and universe that I created in one of my short stories, but I may or may not keep the original title. I’m currently thinking not, the story has changed a lot, but I am yet to think of a good alternative so we’ll see. 2) It’s a mess. It is a first draft as Joanne Fedler describes here: The first draft and the rewriteVomit in a bucket. An apt, if gross, metaphor. But, all the pieces to the puzzle are there. What remains is for me to go back and decide which pieces to keep, which to throw away, and what needs reshaping for a better fit.   Continue reading

What You Can Get

I was reading an article the other day. The details of the article are not important, but as I was reading there was a line that stood out to me:

“Are you focused on what you want, or what you think you can get?”

From the outside, it may appear that I’m doing pretty well going for what I want. I’ve given up not one, but two possible career paths with which I had every reason to think I could be successful—and which would likely have given me long-term financial stability—to pursue writing . Why? Because I want to (not a satisfactory answer to the many raised eyebrows out there).

I want to know what it’s like to make my own Continue reading

Graphite and Ink

Elementary school was all about the pencil. When it wasn’t about the crayon, that is. In that stage of learning the technical fine points of printing and cursive writing, the ability to erase was crucial. But somewhere along the way, in junior high or high school, the pencil became inferior to the pen. Erasers were for wussies. Much cooler to put up with the noxious fumes of whiteout for those (few) mistakes.

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The Power of the Notebook

When I say notebook, I am referring to the paper kind not the PC or Mac kind.

Notebook

I have a friend, also a writer, who I get together with from time to time to write with, chat, share creativity, etc. We were supposed to get together today actually, but I’m sick and wimped out (sorry Cate, we will get together again soon, promise). Anyway, whenever we get together, I drag along my laptop while Cate is much more partial to pen and paper.

I type faster than I can write by hand, my hand writing is borderline illegible, and my ideas don’t always come out in chronological order so I’m a big cut-and-paste user. It’s so easy to go back, do a quick fix, then pick up where I left off. And herein lies the problem. As I’ve alluded to in the past, my quick fixes tend to turn into an endless cycle of touching up and rewriting. This often leads to losing the thread of an idea before I get to the end of it.

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